Surprise a friend with a free ticket

Want to surprise a friend whose birthday is coming up with a free ticket? Attending the “Is America part of the World?” event with a large group? You can now buy 3 tickets online in advance, and you will get the 4th one for free!

Tickets now available at www.brownpapertickets.com

(Please note: This promo is only valid with advance orders, it is not available at the door. This promo cannot be coupled with different orders. Your ticket order has to be in denominations of 3, i.e. 3, 6, 9 tickets. One free ticket for every 3 tickets)

“Is America part of the World?” Teaser Video

“World-weary Nation Beat refuses to be boxed in”

new_nationbeat

Article published in the Brooklyn Courier-Life

By Meredith Deliso

A couple of years ago, Nation Beat, a Brooklyn-based band inspired by Brazilian music, were invited to play at a world music festival. When the organizers asked them not to play any of their English-language songs, the reason why was: it’s a world music festival.

“Our response was, well isn’t America a part of the world?” remembers Scott Kettner, the percussionist for and founder of the band. “It was a big controversy. They finally folded and let us play what we play.”

Continue reading

I Hate World Music, Too

I Hate World Music Too
By Scott Kettner (band leader Nation Beat)
“In my experience, the use of the term world music is a way of dismissing artists or their music as irrelevant to one’s own life. It’s a way of relegating this “thing” into the realm of something exotic and therefore cute, weird but safe, because exotica is beautiful but irrelevant; they are, by definition, not like us.”  It groups everything and anything that isn’t “us” into “them.” – David Byrne 1999 article for the New York Times. http://www.davidbyrne.com/news/press/articles/I_hate_world_music_1999.php
David Byrne hates world music and I do too.  He hits the nail on the head in his article written 10 years ago, and yet our industry still continues to generalize the cultures and the people who make music outside of the USA by grouping them into a generic term to separate “them” from “us”. Even worse, the industry discriminates against US based artists who adopt music from foreign cultures as a main influence in their own music.   They justify their prejudices by calling the music “unauthentic”.  What is authentic anyway?     
Ten years after Byrne’s article the digital download culture has exploded and the world has exponentially become much smaller.  There are millions of artists who live in the US (either born here or immigrated here) who make music that is not sung in one language but two or three (maybe even four…let us know if you find them).  Since there’s no genre or box to group these artists in they’re simply ignored and marginalized by the industry.  And what happens to a band based in the US who has Brazilian and American musicians and sing in English and Portuguese?  When they get invited to perform at a world music festival they’re asked to “please don’t sing the songs in English, especially the American country songs because this is a world music festival”.  That’s what happened to my group Nation Beat last summer.
I was very fortunate to have had the opportunity to perform alongside one of my musical mentors Cyro Baptista for about 3 years.  He always told audiences that “I don’t play Brazilian music, I play music from the world.  I am not a Brazilian citizen, I am a citizen of the world”.  Cyro was challenging people to think outside of the box.  This made sense to me immediately.  Cyro embodies the contemporary musician who can channel every sound he’s ever heard into his own music.  He has traveled the world, downloaded a billion songs from the Internet and has digested it, internalized it and made it his own.  The Brazilian term for this is Anthropofagia, a popular notion among Brazilians that the formation of Brazilian identity resulted from “the constant interaction between diverse cultures, each of which consumed the other until a single, all-encompassing culture was created.” The same exact thing happened here in the US, we call it the Blues.
So what is world music?  Most people say it’s music that’s not sung in English or made in the USA.  Then, what do you call Cajun music, Mardis Gras Indian chants sung in Creole or Tex-Mex music sung in Spanish?   Literally, the term world music means music made in the world.  Isn’t America Part of The World? 

“In my experience, the use of the term world music is a way of dismissing artists or their music as irrelevant to one’s own life. It’s a way of relegating this “thing” into the realm of something exotic and therefore cute, weird but safe, because exotica is beautiful but irrelevant; they are, by definition, not like us.”  It groups everything and anything that isn’t “us” into “them.” – David Byrne 1999 article for the New York Times

 

David Byrne hates world music and I do too.  He hits the nail on the head in his article written 10 years ago, and yet our industry still continues to generalize the cultures and the people who make music outside of the USA by grouping them into a generic term to separate “them” from “us”. Even worse, the industry discriminates against US based artists who adopt music from foreign cultures as a main influence in their own music.   They justify their prejudices by calling the music “unauthentic”.  What is authentic anyway?     

 

Ten years after Byrne’s article the digital download culture has exploded and the world has exponentially become much smaller.  There are millions of artists who live in the US (either born here or immigrated here) who make music that is not sung in one language but two or three (maybe even four…let us know if you find them).  Since there’s no genre or box to group these artists in they’re simply ignored and marginalized by the industry.  And what happens to a band based in the US who has Brazilian and American musicians and sing in English and Portuguese?  When they get invited to perform at a world music festival they’re asked to “please don’t sing the songs in English, especially the American country songs because this is a world music festival”.  That’s what happened to my group Nation Beat last summer.

 

I was very fortunate to have had the opportunity to perform alongside one of my musical mentors Cyro Baptista for about 3 years.  He always told audiences that “I don’t play Brazilian music, I play music from the world.  I am not a Brazilian citizen, I am a citizen of the world”.  Cyro was challenging people to think outside of the box.  This made sense to me immediately.  Cyro embodies the contemporary musician who can channel every sound he’s ever heard into his own music.  He has traveled the world, downloaded a billion songs from the Internet and has digested it, internalized it and made it his own.  The Brazilian term for this is Anthropofagia, a popular notion among Brazilians that the formation of Brazilian identity resulted from “the constant interaction between diverse cultures, each of which consumed the other until a single, all-encompassing culture was created.” The same exact thing happened here in the US, we call it the Blues.

 

So what is world music?  Most people say it’s music that’s not sung in English or made in the USA.  Then, what do you call Cajun music, Mardis Gras Indian chants sung in Creole or Tex-Mex music sung in Spanish?   Literally, the term world music means music made in the world.  Isn’t America Part of The World? 

by Scott Kettner (band leader Nation Beat)

Advance ticket sales have begun

You can now buy limited $10 advance tickets until June 15 for the Is America part of the world? event via brownpapertickets.com. $15 tickets will be available after June 15.

We present to you … our Brand New Flyer

Is_America_Flyer

Is America Part of the World? Outdoor Music Festival

In 2007 NY-based, Brazilian-influenced band Nation Beat was invited to perform at a “world music” festival where they were asked to not play their songs that were in English, specifically their American country songs (the same ones that Willie Nelson sang with them at Farm Aid). This inspired Nation Beat band leader Scott Kettner to bring together musical acts who blur the lines of world music, as well as foster a platform of discussion and debate about this controversial and very vague term.

 

On July 11 Brooklyn, which has become a veritable breeding ground for musicians looking beyond America’s borders for inspiration in recent years, will play host to the launch event of the “Is America Part of The World?” outdoor music festival.  Produced by Nation Beat, Beleza NYC and Electric Lila, the event features four of New York’s premiere music-mixocologists: Forró in the Dark, who dig deep into the sounds of northeastern Brazil, while singing in English, Portuguese, and Spanish, Nation Beat, who create a 21st century fusion between thunderous Brazilian maracatu drumming and New Orleans second line rhythms, bluegrass, and country-blues, Red Baraat Festival, who meld the infectious North Indian rhythm Bhangra with brass funk, dhol, percussion, horns and traditional Punjabi songs, and DJ Nickodemus, who explores the intersection of urban & regional sounds with funk, jazz, hip-hop, house & dub, all seen through the eyes of a New York native.

 

Presented in association with Modiba, National Geographic Music and Afropop Worldwide, these American artists are joining forces to move hips while challenging the way we think about “American” and “World” music. Join us on this joyous celebration as we celebrate the fruits of our cultural exchanges.

 

Saturday, July 11 2009
2pm – 9pm
Nation Beat, Beleza NYC and Electric Lila present
Forro In The Dark
Nation Beat
Red Baraat Festival
DJ Nickodemus

at The BKLYN Yard
388 – 400 Carroll St.(by the Gowanus Canal in Carroll Gardens)
Brooklyn, NY

 

Limited $10 adv tickets available until June 15,  $15 afterwards at brownpapertickets.com, $18 at the door

All ages – Kids under 12 enter for FREE

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